2018 Summer Movie Review: Avengers: Infinity War

 

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It all comes down to this in Avengers: Infinity War! (Source: The Wrap)

It looks like the summer movie season has arrived early this year. After a long, rough winter in Maine, it’s about time to see these superheroes try to save our planet once again.

Can you believe it has been ten years since Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) and Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) started to form the Avengers Initiative? A lot of superheroes have been introduced to the Marvel Cinematic Universe–from the Incredible Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) to Captain America (Chris Evans) to Asgardian god Thor (Chris Hemsworth) to Spider-Man (Tom Holland) to the Guardians of the Galaxy (Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, and Bradley Cooper) to Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman). With every single one of them teaming up to face their biggest challenge yet, it makes the scale of Avengers: Infinity War all the more gargantuan.

While this year brought us the future classic Black Panther, Anthony and Joe Russo are back in the director’s chair since Captain America: Civil War. They hit it out of the park once again in this hilarious, dark, action-packed, visually stunning epic that goes in many unexpected way and brings an emotional punch into its complex narrative. Josh Brolin’s Thanos is easily the most powerful villain in the franchise, who goes on his own mission to collect all of the six Infinity Stones, in order to not only take over the world, but the entire universe. While the movie is far from perfect, fans are most certainly in for a treat!

The MCU is far from over!

3.5/4

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2017 Summer Movie Review: Detroit

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Officer Melvin Dismukes (John Boyega) tries to find out the commotion at the Algiers Motel in Kathryn Bigelow’s Detroit. (Source: IMDb)

Director Kathryn Bigelow has come a long way from collaborating with her ex-husband on Point Break. A movie that is nothing but pure ‘90s entertainment. It’s dumb, hilarious, action-packed, and cool; featuring memorable dialogue and a great cast playing memorable characters. What’s not to love?

Heading into the 21st century, she—along with screenwriter Mark Boal—made the transition to capture the brutal realism of the War on Terrorism in The Hurt Locker (which won the Oscar for Best Picture of 2009) and Zero Dark Thirty. This time, they go back to a devastating time in history. Detroit brings the 1960s culture and the racial tensions of the time to pure life.

Michigan’s largest city has become one of the most diverse in America. Known as The Great Migration (as stated in the film’s opening scene), millions of African-Americans moved from the cotton fields of the South to the Northern states in hopes of living a better life and earn extra money. After World War II, however, the white population moved to the suburbs which caused tensions to rise.

On one of the hottest days of 1967, the police force (who are mostly white) make arrests on the streets, which pisses off the black community. They start robbing stores, put buildings and cars on fire, and protest to no end. The National Guard, the Michigan PD, and the Detroit PD patrol the streets day in and day out, and address a curfew to the residents.

Melvin Dismukes (John Boyega) is a security guard who hears shots at the nearby Algiers Motel. He goes over there to see what’s going on. Three white cops, led by Philip Krauss (Will Poulter) who has faced murder charges for killing a black male from robbing a grocery store in broad daylight. He lines people up against the wall to find out who’s responsible for shooting at the police. This resulted in three black males getting killed, and nine others—including a Vietnam veteran (Anthony Mackie) and two white females, Julie (Hannah Murray) and Karen (Kaitlyn Dever, Last Man Standing)—injured.

The riots from fifty years ago are relevant to the racial tensions of today—from the shooting in Ferguson, Missouri, to the shooting of Oscar Grant at San Francisco’s Fruitvale Station (depicted in 2013’s overlooked Fruitvale Station), to the riots in Baltimore in 2015; where a game between the Orioles and the Boston Red Sox went on without any fans in the stadium whatsoever. Detroit is a reminder of today’s racial discrimination.

Barry Ackroyd’s handheld camerawork resembles the films of Peter Berg and Paul Greengrass. The entire sequence at the Algiers Motel had the same impact as the lifeboat sequence in Captain Phillips; nothing but edge-of-your-seat intensity. While filmed in Dorchester, Massachusetts, the sets look as authentic as the city and the events that took place.

I cannot ask for a better cast. From Poulter’s sinister work as Officer Krauss to Boyega’s raw, convincing performance as Officer Dismukes (who seems to be a great guy to be around with, particularly in an early scene where he serves coffee to a small group of white officers), Algee Smith steals the entire movie as Larry Reed, the lead singer of the Dramatics, with a stellar voice. After his performance gets cancelled, reality begins to hit him across the face.

According to an article in the Detroit Free Press, most of the audience members who attended the world premiere at the Fox Theatre were actually a part of the riots—from police officers to ordinary residents. They were moved to tears over the film’s portrayal. It’s a shame Detroit underperformed at the box office this past weekend. This is a movie everybody needs to see; not to mention being viewed in every high school in America.

4/4

 

Movie Review: Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)

Marvel's First Avenger comes back to face against the Winter Soldier

Marvel’s First Avenger comes back to face against the Winter Soldier

I am not a comic book reader, but I am quite a comic book movie aficionado. Either if they are based on the DC or Marvel Comics, I would become invested in the superhero’s motivations; how the characters got their powers and knowing what it means to become a true hero in our society. Captain America is one of the more fascinating of all of the superheroes I have seen. He’s right up there with Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, and Iron Man–to name a few.

The new movie featuring the iconic hero, Captain America: The Winter Soldier is more than just another Marvel superhero movie. It is, on its own terms, a political thriller featuring enough action, twists, turns, and laughs to rank it among the best of Marvel’s movies, which are The Avengers and Iron Man.

Providing a more complex story than its predecessor from 2011, the movie opens up with Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) living a quiet life in Washington, D.C. Because he has been struggling to fit into our society after being frozen for 70 years, he decides to catch up on all the pop culture he missed out on since the 1940s. When S.H.I.E.L.D. becomes threatened by an assassin known as the Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) coming into our nation’s capital, Rogers suits up, once again, as Captain America, teams up with Natasha Romanoff a.k.a. Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Sam Wilson a.k.a. The Falcon (Anthony Mackie) to solve the mystery.

Chris Evans brings a lot more depth into his role of Steve Rogers/Captain America. You can tell how much he has gone through over the years. Although he still has the charm and confidence, he realizes how powerful his abilities are. Becoming  skilled in parkour, martial arts, running, and boxing, he could probably set plenty of records in the Olympic Games.

Samuel L. Jackson proves how awesome he truly is as Nick Fury in one of the movie’s biggest action sequence. Scarlett Johansson is always great as Black Widow; I think it’s time for a Black Widow movie. Robert Redford’s Alexander Pierce, the senior leader of S.H.I.E.L.D., makes a fantastic antagonist in one marvelous film.

4/4