Home » 2019 Summer Movie Review » 2019 Summer Movie Review: Yesterday

2019 Summer Movie Review: Yesterday

yesterday-smoothradio

Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) becomes Britain’s biggest pop sensation in Danny Boyle’s Yesterday. (Source: Smooth Radio)

The Beatles have been loved for generations, since their successful U.S. debut on The Ed Sullivan Show. In 1964, 73 million people tuned in on an exciting night during a time where the nation mourned for the death of JFK. Their fears soon faded once the band performed in front of a screaming audience. It established a popularity in other British bands in the U.S., including The Kinks and The Rolling Stones. 

Their music has been used in numerous movies; famously in A Hard Day’s Night, where John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr play satirical versions of themselves, and Across the Universe, a dazzling yet overblown jukebox musical set over the course of 1960s history. 

We already have an enjoyably trashy biopic of Queen (Bohemian Rhapsody) and a magical rendition of Elton John’s life (Rocketman). With two upcoming films featuring music of Bruce Springsteen (Blinded by the Light) and a Christmas-themed film featuring the music of George Michael (Last Christmas), 2019 might end up being a fun year for these type of films featuring classic artists. Now–director Danny Boyle and screenwriter Richard Curtis collaborate for the first time to give the audience another jukebox musical featuring the wonderful music of The Beatles with Yesterday, a movie that is less of an acid trip than Across the Universe.

Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) lives in the small seaport town of Lowestoft. He’s a struggling singer-songwriter to make a name for himself. One night, the unthinkable happens. A worldwide power outage occurs when he gets hit by a bus. Once released from the hospital, he performs a gorgeous rendition of “Yesterday” in front of his childhood crush Ellie (Lily James) and a group of his friends, in which they thought he originally wrote the song. Befuddled, Jack eventually finds out he is in a world where The Beatles and their music never existed. He becomes a worldwide phenomenon from recording their music at a local recording studio, with the support of his new manager Debra (Kate McKinnon) and Ed Sheeran (playing a fictional version of himself).

The poster consists of Jack walking across the iconic Abbey Road alone with a guitar on his back. The tagline reads: “Yesterday, everyone knew The Beatles. Today, only Jack remembers their music. He’s about to become a very big deal.” 

With that, he sure does! Although with disappointing results.

For his theatrical debut, Patel has great talent as a singer; putting enough vibrant energy into the 17 Beatles songs used in the film. With the music aside, as Jack, he comes across as a character with little to no personality. Sadly, same goes to the charming Lily James, whom I loved in Cinderella, Baby Driver, and last year’s Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again

Even with a gifted supporting cast, there are stuck in a setting with barely any character. The concept is nothing short of genius with some humor thrown into the mix. Unfortunately, there is nothing to save for the narrative containing barely any surprises.

The movie does have its moments. All of the songs used (imagine how long it must have taken to accept the copyrights) are wonderfully covered by Patel, a talent I could actually see having a more successful music career. Without giving anything away, the movie has surprisingly touching final act I think a box of tissues is required. Other than that, Yesterday is a movie I wanted to like. However, it ends up as a bland and borderline heartless musical that will attract Ed Sheeran fangirls.

5.5/10

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